Posts

Boating Terms and Trivia To Impress Your Friends

Image
Ahoy, mateys! This be a fair and true listing of a few words and a little trivia as to the origin  having to do with ships and sailing.  These terms come mainly from the great age of sailing ships, the 16th to 18th centuries, and almost all hail from  great seafaring peoples of the day, those being English, Norse, Dutch and German.        Bow                            "forward part of a ship," beginning where the sides trend inward, mid-14 century, from a source such as Old Norse  bogr , Middle Low German  boog , Middle Dutch  boech  "bow of a ship," from Proto-Germanic  *bugon- , from PIE root  *bheug-  "to bend," with derivatives referring to bent, pliable, or curved objects. Stern                             "Hind part of a ship; steering gear of a ship," probably from a Scandinavian source, such as old Old Norse  stjorn  "a steering," related to or derived from  styra  "to guide".   Or the word may come from Old Frisian 

Distraction Equals Disaster

Image
  With increased traffic on the waterways, those at the helm need to maintain a proper lookout. Leave smartphones alone, and know when to tune out conversations on board.  As captain you are responsible for the safety and well fare of not only  all on board, but other boaters as well. 2020 Lake of the Ozarks had 97 incidences 84 of these were boating accidents where drinking, inattention, no lookout contributed to accidents. The Coast Guard describes operator inattention as “failure on the part of the operator to pay attention to the vessel, its occupants or the environment in which the vessel is operating.” Although it’s difficult to determine how many boating accidents actually happen as a result of boat operators or lookouts texting or otherwise using electronic devices such as cellphones, laptops and tablets, there’s little doubt that such activities are a big part of the problem. Rapid growth in the use of wireless devices wreaks havoc for operators of all types of vehicles, inclu

Michigan’s Famous Christmas Tree Ship

Image
  LAKE MICHIGAN – The shipwreck legend of Michigan’s famed “Christmas Tree Ship” remains shrouded in equal parts myth and mystery. But what we do know is this: 108 years ago today, that worn-out schooner helmed by a man nicknamed “Captain Santa” and weighed down heavily by a load of U.P. Christmas trees bound for Chicago was fighting a mighty battle against intensifying winds and waves of a coming storm. In their final minutes, the Rouse Simmons’ crew had thrown out the schooner’s port anchor into Lake Michigan, hoping to hold her into the wind, archeologists later discovered. In the words of the dive team who pieced together her last tragic moments: “something had gone seriously wrong aboard the vessel.” Overcome by large waves, the three-masted schooner went down hard on the afternoon of Nov. 23, 1912, her bow leaving a 10-foot-deep gash in the bottom of Lake Michigan. Lost with her were 16 souls – her captain, crew, and a group of lumberjacks who were hitching a ride to the Windy Ci

Is it Real or a Scam

Image
  There is always someone out to take you money, by hook or by crook.   If you receive a letter from U.S. VESSEL DOCUMENTATION in California telling you that your USCG Document is about to expire – DO NOT REPLY! Actual vessel documentation is handled by the U.S. Coast Guard in Virginia. We have heard from several boaters that they received a very official-looking notification, and it referenced a very official-looking web site. The letter claimed that if the recipient did not reply/renew within 45 days he could be subject to a $10,000 fine and other fees. The recipient could renew for $75.00, or for 5 years for $300. The cost to legitimately renew your Document is $26.00 per year. If you need to renew yours with the USCG, you can go to  https://www.uscg.mil/hq/cg5/nvdc  . What is a Documented Vessel? A  documented vessel  is one that is registered by the Federal Government through the  U. S. Coast Guard , rather than titled and numbered by a state. Pleasure  vessels  of 5 net tons and

Cold Water Kills Are You Next?

Image
C old weather deaths happen to often when some penetrative measures can save a life.    Hypothermia in layman's terms is  decreased body temperature.  this condition happens more slowly than the effects of cold shock and you might not be immediately aware of the symptoms. Normal body temp is 98.6.. .Mild  hypothermia begins at 95 degrees body temp.  At 90 degrees there is moderate shivering, dizziness, lack of coordination, some confusion and fatigue.  Moderate hypothermia 89.6 degrees body temp.  Shivering stops, consciousness becomes impaired hard to stay awake. Severe hypothermia 75.2 degrees body temp.  Apparent Death - irreversible hypothermia 59 degrees body temp  Uncontrolled or rapid breathing will speed up the chilling process. When the body's core temperature falls to 93?F. physical ability is severely diminished and mental capacity begins to deteriorate rapidly. A victim usually falls into an unconscious state when body temperature falls to 86?F. If the victim doe

Circle of Death

Image
  Two young fisherman Hunter Bland and Conner Young are  t wo anglers from University of Florida College Bass Fishing team captured a very scary boating accident on their GoPro camera while running 55 mph.   Hunter Bland is the National Boating Safety Advocate for Skeeter and  Yamaha. As well as a spokesperson for  Waves of Hope, a program of the National Safe Boating Council, is a coalition of families and friends committed to preventing boating and water tragedies. Learn more at www.wavesofhopeboating.org.   If it was not for the FLW requiring  all participants to wear life jackets and kill switches while running.”   and the quick thinking of  his fishing partner Conner Young, both would not be here today to tell their story. History of emergency engine cut off switch ( Kill Switch)  Although the U.S. Coast Guard is still considering regulations that would require boat builders to install kill switches (emergency engine cut-off switches) in all new recreational boats below a certa